Kevin F. Kelly, bookseller ††† phone: (646) 895-9858 ††† books@kevinkellybookseller.com

home

books

about me

 

[Indian Music.] Tagore, Sourindro Mohun. Victoria - Gitika, or Sanskrit Verses, Celebrating the Deeds and Virtues of Queen Victoria and her predecessors.

Calcutta: Printed and Published by I. C. Bose & Co.,, 1875. First edition. Octavo. Parallel text in Sanskrit & English. Original Calcutta binding of pebbled red morocco, spine and cover richly gilt, board edges and inner dentelles gilt, a.e.g. Some surface rubbing to extremities, small abrasion to gilt on front cover, still a very good or better copy.

First (only?) edition. A peculiar homage to Queen Victoria and previous sovereigns of Great Britain. Quite a handsome production both in printing and binding, this work is of particular interest to the study of the history of Raga; and more generally to the history of Indian culture in Colonial India. "In 1875 the Bengali Musicologist Sir Saurindo Mohun Tagore (1840-1914) published a curious work entitled Victoria-Gitika... This is a work which graphically demonstrates the strange assortment of conflicting national loyalties and admixtures of languages, musical systems, and theories which characterizes the meeting between Indian music ansd the West in nineteenth-century India. Tagore's preface is a masterpiece of double-talk about, on the one hand, the greatness of British dominion over India and elsewhere, on the other, the importance and national singularity of Hindu music." - [Farrell]. Tagore was a leading Indian musicologist and patron of Indian music. A descendant of one of the wealthiest and most influential families in Calcutta (Rabindranath Tagore belonged to another branch of the family), he sponsored or co-authored some of the first general music treatises in Bengali. Such vernacular publications, produced and promoted by the Calcutta élite, were an important part of the renaissance in Bengali culture which took place in the 19th century. Tagore founded several schools of music in Calcutta beginning in 1871, and supplied music teachers and books to these and other public and private schools at his own cost. His publications ranged from music treatises in Sanskrit and Bengali to explanations of Indian music for a colonial audience. These publications were aimed at British and European orientalists both in India and in Europe as well as the Bengali intelligentsia centered in Calcutta He endeavoured to promote Indian music in the West as a symbol of India's classical heritage, comparable to European art music in artistic and academic value. (New Grove).Very scarce. [Farrell, Gerry. "Indian Music and the West".] (#kfk308) $1,500.00

 

home

books

about me